OLAC Record
oai:www.mpi.nl:lat_1839_00_0000_0000_0022_4EA9_8

Metadata
Title:TBA-20140814-ESR-MT-parentesco
parentesco com MT
Contributor:DobeS Team
Contributor (consultant):Maria Tadeu
Contributor (singer):Maria Tadeu
Contributor (speaker):Maria Tadeu
Contributor (translator):Maria Tadeu
Coverage:Brazil
Amazonia
(macro-região, como "norte" "centro-oeste")
(estado, UF)
(município)
(parque / terra indígena, se houver)
Description:For the purpose of establishing an extended family tree of the people from the Tubarão-Latundê and traditional personal naming patters, Lisa Katharina Grund interviewed people about their family history and personal Aikanã names of their forebears. This recording represents one of such conversations and was mainly for the purpose of documenting the information talked about. The interviews about family histories, with focus on the parents’ and grandparents’ generation, who are now in their 60´s (or older), of kinship relations in the village, and the Aikanã system of name-giving, were useful in order to draw a number of extensive kinship diagrams, using the respective personal Aikanã (Kanoê, Salamãi, or Kwazá) names. While many conversations about family, kinship relations and name-giving happened over a period of several weeks, and were conducted on a house-to-house basis, information about names, life events, birth and death, as well as personality traits of key elders and kin, is a result, in particular, of the knowledge of three older women, Maria Tadeu, Marião and Peridalva Salamãi. Kinship interviews were usually accompanied by an audio recorder, in some cases with video and always with additional note-taking and drawing. The enquiry about Aikanã name-giving practices and kinship relations led to numerous interesting stories about village elders, shamans and chiefs, past settlements and events, as well as ethnic conceptualisations. Note that there are several subgroups that make up Aikanã ethnic identity- Wɨĩzakɨi’ene, Wɨikuruta’ene, Maru’ene- showing multiple historicities of the region. It also informs about Aikanã social practices and political organisation. While the most common practice of name-giving is that from grandparents to grandchildren, as well as uncles and aunts from the parents’ as well as grandparents’ generation, reasons for the choice of names, of course, are more diverse. Some children might receive names from unrelated people, but who share an influential and important history and relationship with their parents. Thus, every name has a story to it, due to its meaning and the personal histories of the generations of people that carried it before. Aikanã names are passed on, and with them their meanings, to remember the deceased. There are personal names, for instance, that refer to people’s appearance like “Hadidesa’I” (‘blond or red hair’, lit. ‘red flower’); characteristic traits like the nickname for Captain Pedro, “Asasare” (signifying “white” or “cruel” person); or animals and their features like “Awaji” (lit. macaw feather). Names are spiritually powerful, and those names of relatives, who died as a result of murder or because of shamanic rituals are not passed on and even avoided in daily conversations. Looking at names and analysing kinship relations through name-giving practices, can also help to widen the understanding of the regional inter-ethnic history. Even if some names have spread throughout the region that cannot be traced back to a specific ethnic origin, such as the female name Inute, which is encountered among the Aikanã, Kwazá, Akuntsu and perhaps other groups, it might be able to tell about relationship and contact among these different groups. Exploring the meaning of names and name-giving practices and documenting and analysing a variety of personal memories and regional historicities, certainly leads to many valuable insights that can be gathered from these kinship diagrams.For the purpose of establishing an extended family tree of the people from the Tubarão-Latundê and traditional personal naming patters, Lisa Katharina Grund interviewed people about their family history and personal Aikanã names of their forebears. This recording represents one of such conversations and was mainly for the purpose of documenting the information talked about. The interviews about family histories, with focus on the parents’ and grandparents’ generation, who are now in their 60´s (or older), of kinship relations in the village, and the Aikanã system of name-giving, were useful in order to draw a number of extensive kinship diagrams, using the respective personal Aikanã (Kanoê, Salamãi, or Kwazá) names. While many conversations about family, kinship relations and name-giving happened over a period of several weeks, and were conducted on a house-to-house basis, information about names, life events, birth and death, as well as personality traits of key elders and kin, is a result, in particular, of the knowledge of three older women, Maria Tadeu, Marião and Peridalva Salamãi. Kinship interviews were usually accompanied by an audio recorder, in some cases with video and always with additional note-taking and drawing. The enquiry about Aikanã name-giving practices and kinship relations led to numerous interesting stories about village elders, shamans and chiefs, past settlements and events, as well as ethnic conceptualisations. Note that there are several subgroups that make up Aikanã ethnic identity- Wɨĩzakɨi’ene, Wɨikuruta’ene, Maru’ene- showing multiple historicities of the region. It also informs about Aikanã social practices and political organisation. While the most common practice of name-giving is that from grandparents to grandchildren, as well as uncles and aunts from the parents’ as well as grandparents’ generation, reasons for the choice of names, of course, are more diverse. Some children might receive names from unrelated people, but who share an influential and important history and relationship with their parents. Thus, every name has a story to it, due to its meaning and the personal histories of the generations of people that carried it before. Aikanã names are passed on, and with them their meanings, to remember the deceased. There are personal names, for instance, that refer to people’s appearance like “Hadidesa’I” (‘blond or red hair’, lit. ‘red flower’); characteristic traits like the nickname for Captain Pedro, “Asasare” (signifying “white” or “cruel” person); or animals and their features like “Awaji” (lit. macaw feather). Names are spiritually powerful, and those names of relatives, who died as a result of murder or because of shamanic rituals are not passed on and even avoided in daily conversations. Looking at names and analysing kinship relations through name-giving practices, can also help to widen the understanding of the regional inter-ethnic history. Even if some names have spread throughout the region that cannot be traced back to a specific ethnic origin, such as the female name Inute, which is encountered among the Aikanã, Kwazá, Akuntsu and perhaps other groups, it might be able to tell about relationship and contact among these different groups. Exploring the meaning of names and name-giving practices and documenting and analysing a variety of personal memories and regional historicities, certainly leads to many valuable insights that can be gathered from these kinship diagrams.For the purpose of establishing an extended family tree of the people from the Tubarão-Latundê and traditional personal naming patters, Lisa Katharina Grund interviewed people about their family history and personal Aikanã names of their forebears. This recording represents one of such conversations and was mainly for the purpose of documenting the information talked about. The interviews about family histories, with focus on the parents’ and grandparents’ generation, who are now in their 60´s (or older), of kinship relations in the village, and the Aikanã system of name-giving, were useful in order to draw a number of extensive kinship diagrams, using the respective personal Aikanã (Kanoê, Salamãi, or Kwazá) names. While many conversations about family, kinship relations and name-giving happened over a period of several weeks, and were conducted on a house-to-house basis, information about names, life events, birth and death, as well as personality traits of key elders and kin, is a result, in particular, of the knowledge of three older women, Maria Tadeu, Marião and Peridalva Salamãi. Kinship interviews were usually accompanied by an audio recorder, in some cases with video and always with additional note-taking and drawing. The enquiry about Aikanã name-giving practices and kinship relations led to numerous interesting stories about village elders, shamans and chiefs, past settlements and events, as well as ethnic conceptualisations. Note that there are several subgroups that make up Aikanã ethnic identity- Wɨĩzakɨi’ene, Wɨikuruta’ene, Maru’ene- showing multiple historicities of the region. It also informs about Aikanã social practices and political organisation. While the most common practice of name-giving is that from grandparents to grandchildren, as well as uncles and aunts from the parents’ as well as grandparents’ generation, reasons for the choice of names, of course, are more diverse. Some children might receive names from unrelated people, but who share an influential and important history and relationship with their parents. Thus, every name has a story to it, due to its meaning and the personal histories of the generations of people that carried it before. Aikanã names are passed on, and with them their meanings, to remember the deceased. There are personal names, for instance, that refer to people’s appearance like “Hadidesa’I” (‘blond or red hair’, lit. ‘red flower’); characteristic traits like the nickname for Captain Pedro, “Asasare” (signifying “white” or “cruel” person); or animals and their features like “Awaji” (lit. macaw feather). Names are spiritually powerful, and those names of relatives, who died as a result of murder or because of shamanic rituals are not passed on and even avoided in daily conversations. Looking at names and analysing kinship relations through name-giving practices, can also help to widen the understanding of the regional inter-ethnic history. Even if some names have spread throughout the region that cannot be traced back to a specific ethnic origin, such as the female name Inute, which is encountered among the Aikanã, Kwazá, Akuntsu and perhaps other groups, it might be able to tell about relationship and contact among these different groups. Exploring the meaning of names and name-giving practices and documenting and analysing a variety of personal memories and regional historicities, certainly leads to many valuable insights that can be gathered from these kinship diagrams.
Identifier (URI):https://hdl.handle.net/1839/00-0000-0000-0022-4EA9-8
Is Part Of:DoBeS archive : Sudeste de Rondonia - Southeastern Rondonia
Language:Portuguese
Aikanã
Language (ISO639):por
tba
Publisher:The Language Archive, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics
Subject:Portuguese language
Aikanã language
Subject (ISO639):por
tba

OLAC Info

Archive:  The Language Archive
Description:  http://www.language-archives.org/archive/www.mpi.nl
GetRecord:  OAI-PMH request for OLAC format
GetRecord:  Pre-generated XML file

OAI Info

OaiIdentifier:  oai:www.mpi.nl:lat_1839_00_0000_0000_0022_4EA9_8
DateStamp:  2018-04-06
GetRecord:  OAI-PMH request for simple DC format

Search Info

Citation: Maria Tadeu (consultant); Maria Tadeu (speaker); Maria Tadeu (singer); Maria Tadeu (translator); DobeS Team. n.d. DoBeS archive : Sudeste de Rondonia - Southeastern Rondonia.
Terms: area_Americas area_Europe country_BR country_PT iso639_por iso639_tba

Inferred Metadata

Country: BrazilPortugal
Area: AmericasEurope


http://www.language-archives.org/item.php/oai:www.mpi.nl:lat_1839_00_0000_0000_0022_4EA9_8
Up-to-date as of: Fri Feb 8 17:47:26 EST 2019