OLAC Record
oai:scholarspace.manoa.hawaii.edu:10125/42065

Metadata
Title:Can language and cultural continuity protect against diabetes in First Nations communities?
Bibliographic Citation:Oster, Richard, Lightning, Patrick, Oster, Richard, Lightning, Patrick; 2017-03-05; Here is a plethora of deficit-focused literature and research detailing the many health conditions that disproportionately and negatively impact Indigenous peoples in North America and around the world. Type 2 diabetes in particular is often front and center, given that its incidence and prevalence have increased dramatically over the past three to four decades and its complications continue to wreak havoc in many Indigenous populations. At the same time, Indigenous peoples have been voicing a message of an association between the loss and destruction of their traditional cultures and ways of life, and the subsequent impact on their health. Focusing primarily on Canadian Indigenous populations, in this session we will 1) provide an brief overview of the burden of type 2 diabetes and its complications in Indigenous peoples; 2) describe a simple model for the underlying causes drawing attention to the fundamental role of colonial domination and cultural/language genocide; 3) detail some of our recent research related to cultural continuity, traditional language, and type
2 diabetes; and 4) provide a Cree community specific perspective on the disease.; Kaipuleohone University of Hawai'i Digital Language Archive;http://hdl.handle.net/10125/42065.
Contributor (speaker):Oster, Richard
Lightning, Patrick
Creator:Oster, Richard
Lightning, Patrick
Date (W3CDTF):2017-03-05
Description:Here is a plethora of deficit-focused literature and research detailing the many health conditions that disproportionately and negatively impact Indigenous peoples in North America and around the world. Type 2 diabetes in particular is often front and center, given that its incidence and prevalence have increased dramatically over the past three to four decades and its complications continue to wreak havoc in many Indigenous populations. At the same time, Indigenous peoples have been voicing a message of an association between the loss and destruction of their traditional cultures and ways of life, and the subsequent impact on their health. Focusing primarily on Canadian Indigenous populations, in this session we will 1) provide an brief overview of the burden of type 2 diabetes and its complications in Indigenous peoples; 2) describe a simple model for the underlying causes drawing attention to the fundamental role of colonial domination and cultural/language genocide; 3) detail some of our recent research related to cultural continuity, traditional language, and type
2 diabetes; and 4) provide a Cree community specific perspective on the disease.
Identifier (URI):http://hdl.handle.net/10125/42065
Table Of Contents:42065.pdf
42065.mp3
Type (DCMI):Text
Sound

OLAC Info

Archive:  Language Documentation and Conservation
Description:  http://www.language-archives.org/archive/ldc.scholarspace.manoa.hawaii.edu
GetRecord:  OAI-PMH request for OLAC format
GetRecord:  Pre-generated XML file

OAI Info

OaiIdentifier:  oai:scholarspace.manoa.hawaii.edu:10125/42065
DateStamp:  2017-05-11
GetRecord:  OAI-PMH request for simple DC format

Search Info

Citation: Oster, Richard; Lightning, Patrick. 2017. Language Documentation and Conservation.
Terms: dcmi_Sound dcmi_Text


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Up-to-date as of: Sun Nov 17 9:17:54 EST 2019