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oai:scholarspace.manoa.hawaii.edu:10125/41962

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Title:Mixture Pronunciation and Particle as Communicative Strategies in Migration Communities
Bibliographic Citation:Chen, Chun-Mei, Chen, Chun-Mei; 2017-03-03; In this paper mixture pronunciation and particle as communicative strategies in face-to-face conversation attested in two Paiwan migration communities were examined as a case of supporting the argument that community-based approach to language pedagogy have implications for language maintenance and vitalization. Paiwan is an Austronesian language spoken in Southern Taiwan, with around 53,000 speakers. All of the Paiwan speakers are aware of the segmental varieties among the dialects, but the geographical boundaries among northern, central, and southern Paiwan dialects are not solid. Two migration communities were investigated, Taiping and Dali, located in Taichung, about 200 miles away from the native communities. The first-generation Paiwan speakers relocated in the migration community at the age of 10-20. Second-generation Paiwan speakers need to learn the indigenous language either from their family members or school teachers. The project includes documenting mixture pronunciation and particle, investigating attitudes towards speaking the indigenous language between two generations of Paiwan speakers. Results suggest that there are two types of mixture pronunciation, areal and Mandarin-influenced variation. Overuse of the Paiwan particle ‘pai’ among the second-generation Paiwan speakers serves as one of the communicative strategy in initiating native language code in their face-to-face interaction. Longer residence with frequent contact with the Paiwan community members may facilitate the manipulation of mixture pronunciation and particle. The project further describes the benefits of a community-based approach in the migration communities in the specific cultural setting. It has been concluded that overuse of Paiwan particle could be relevant to speakers’ identity and security in inner-circle communication in the migration communities. The comparison between the native and migration varieties has reinforced the understanding of the sociolinguistic factors in the Paiwan language. It is suggested that community-based language pedagogy include comprehensive pronunciation choices and communicative tasks in assessing second-generation learners’ Paiwan proficiency and accuracy.; Kaipuleohone University of Hawai'i Digital Language Archive;http://hdl.handle.net/10125/41962.
Contributor (speaker):Chen, Chun-Mei
Creator:Chen, Chun-Mei
Date (W3CDTF):2017-03-03
Description:In this paper mixture pronunciation and particle as communicative strategies in face-to-face conversation attested in two Paiwan migration communities were examined as a case of supporting the argument that community-based approach to language pedagogy have implications for language maintenance and vitalization. Paiwan is an Austronesian language spoken in Southern Taiwan, with around 53,000 speakers. All of the Paiwan speakers are aware of the segmental varieties among the dialects, but the geographical boundaries among northern, central, and southern Paiwan dialects are not solid. Two migration communities were investigated, Taiping and Dali, located in Taichung, about 200 miles away from the native communities. The first-generation Paiwan speakers relocated in the migration community at the age of 10-20. Second-generation Paiwan speakers need to learn the indigenous language either from their family members or school teachers. The project includes documenting mixture pronunciation and particle, investigating attitudes towards speaking the indigenous language between two generations of Paiwan speakers. Results suggest that there are two types of mixture pronunciation, areal and Mandarin-influenced variation. Overuse of the Paiwan particle ‘pai’ among the second-generation Paiwan speakers serves as one of the communicative strategy in initiating native language code in their face-to-face interaction. Longer residence with frequent contact with the Paiwan community members may facilitate the manipulation of mixture pronunciation and particle. The project further describes the benefits of a community-based approach in the migration communities in the specific cultural setting. It has been concluded that overuse of Paiwan particle could be relevant to speakers’ identity and security in inner-circle communication in the migration communities. The comparison between the native and migration varieties has reinforced the understanding of the sociolinguistic factors in the Paiwan language. It is suggested that community-based language pedagogy include comprehensive pronunciation choices and communicative tasks in assessing second-generation learners’ Paiwan proficiency and accuracy.
Identifier (URI):http://hdl.handle.net/10125/41962
Table Of Contents:41962.mp3
Type (DCMI):Sound

OLAC Info

Archive:  Language Documentation and Conservation
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OAI Info

OaiIdentifier:  oai:scholarspace.manoa.hawaii.edu:10125/41962
DateStamp:  2017-05-11
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Search Info

Citation: Chen, Chun-Mei. 2017. Language Documentation and Conservation.
Terms: dcmi_Sound


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