Sample Metadata Record

oai:elar.soas.ac.uk:0001


XML format

<olac:olac>
<dc:title>Auslan Corpus</dc:title>
<dc:contributor xsi:type="olac:role" olac:code="depositor">Trevor Johnston</dc:contributor>
<dc:contributor xsi:type="olac:role" olac:code="sponsor">Endangered Languages Documentation Programme</dc:contributor>
<dc:coverage>Australia (Perth, Adelaide, Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane)</dc:coverage>
<dc:coverage>Australian deaf community</dc:coverage>
<dcterms:spatial xsi:type="dcterms:ISO3166">AU</dcterms:spatial>
<dcterms:spatial xsi:type="dcterms:Point">east=133.974610; north=-25.165173</dcterms:spatial>
<dc:description>Auslan (Australian Sign Language) is the signed language of the deaf community in Australia. It has evolved from forms of British Sign Language (BSL) which were brought to Australia in the 19th century. It is used by approximately 6,500 deaf people as their first or preferred language. The number of deaf users of Auslan appears to have peaked in the 1980s and now seems to be declining due to a variety of factors, such as aging, decreasing incidence rates of permanent early childhood severe and profound deafness, and high rates of cochlear implantation. Consequently, the number of new deaf signers being added to the community on a year by year basis is modest and the language is likely to become endangered within a generation or two. The corpus supports initial and future corpus-based grammatical description of the language and serves as a basis for comparison of this relatively old signed language with the emerging signed languages of newly created deaf communities that can be found in the developing world.</dc:description>
<dc:identifier xsi:type="dcterms:URI">http://elar.soas.ac.uk/deposit/0001</dc:identifier>
<dc:language xsi:type="olac:language" olac:code="asf"/>
<dc:publisher>Endangered Languages Archive</dc:publisher>
<dc:publisher xsi:type="dcterms:URI">http://elar-archive.org</dc:publisher>
<dcterms:license xsi:type="dcterms:URI">http://www.elar-archive.org/using-elar/terms-conditions.php</dcterms:license>
<dc:subject xsi:type="olac:language">Auslan</dc:subject>
<dc:type xsi:type="dcterms:DCMIType">Collection</dc:type>
<dc:provenance>The Auslan Corpus was deposited at the Endangered Languages Archive in late 2008. From 2008 to the present the depositor and fellow researchers have been glossing, translating and annotating parts of the corpus using ELAN in order to make it machine readable and searchable. Parts of the video deposit are publicly accessible and other parts are accessible to subscribers on application to the depositor. It is expected that glossing, translation and annotation work on the corpus will take many years to complete. Less than half of the video recordings have been given a basic annotation (i.e. glossed and given a free translation). Only those associated with the Aesop's fables (topics: "The boy who cried wolf" and "The hare and the tortoise") have been checked and validated and thus only those .eafs are currently accessible. The deposit will be augmented with additional annotation files as they become available, i.e. after they have been completed and checked. It is anticipated the next addition in accessible files will be made during the second half of 2012.</dc:provenance>
</olac:olac>

Display format

 Title  Auslan Corpus
 Contributor (depositor)  Trevor Johnston
 Contributor (sponsor)  Endangered Languages Documentation Programme
 Coverage  Australia (Perth, Adelaide, Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane)
 Coverage  Australian deaf community
 Spatial (ISO3166)  AU
 Spatial (Point)  east=133.974610; north=-25.165173
 Description  Auslan (Australian Sign Language) is the signed language of the deaf community in Australia. It has evolved from forms of British Sign Language (BSL) which were brought to Australia in the 19th century. It is used by approximately 6,500 deaf people as their first or preferred language. The number of deaf users of Auslan appears to have peaked in the 1980s and now seems to be declining due to a variety of factors, such as aging, decreasing incidence rates of permanent early childhood severe and profound deafness, and high rates of cochlear implantation. Consequently, the number of new deaf signers being added to the community on a year by year basis is modest and the language is likely to become endangered within a generation or two. The corpus supports initial and future corpus-based grammatical description of the language and serves as a basis for comparison of this relatively old signed language with the emerging signed languages of newly created deaf communities that can be found in the developing world.
 Identifier (URI)  http://elar.soas.ac.uk/deposit/0001
 Language (ISO639-3)  Australian Sign Language [asf]
 Publisher  Endangered Languages Archive
 Publisher (URI)  http://elar-archive.org
 License (URI)  http://www.elar-archive.org/using-elar/terms-conditions.php
 Subject (ISO639-3)  [], Auslan
 Type (DCMI)  Collection
 Provenance  The Auslan Corpus was deposited at the Endangered Languages Archive in late 2008. From 2008 to the present the depositor and fellow researchers have been glossing, translating and annotating parts of the corpus using ELAN in order to make it machine readable and searchable. Parts of the video deposit are publicly accessible and other parts are accessible to subscribers on application to the depositor. It is expected that glossing, translation and annotation work on the corpus will take many years to complete. Less than half of the video recordings have been given a basic annotation (i.e. glossed and given a free translation). Only those associated with the Aesop's fables (topics: "The boy who cried wolf" and "The hare and the tortoise") have been checked and validated and thus only those .eafs are currently accessible. The deposit will be augmented with additional annotation files as they become available, i.e. after they have been completed and checked. It is anticipated the next addition in accessible files will be made during the second half of 2012.

Metadata quality analysis

OLAC metadata records are scored for metadata quality on a 10-point scale explained in OLAC Metadata Metrics. The score for the above record (along with comments on changes that could improve the score) is as follows:

Component + - Comments
Title   1   0 
Date   0   1  Add a dc:date element (or one of its refinements, like dcterms:created or dcterms:issued).
Agent   1   0 
About   1   0 
Depth   1   0 
Content Language   1   0 
Subject Language   0   1  Add a dc:subject element with an ISO 639-3 code to identify the language which the resource is about.
OLAC Type   0   1  Add a dc:type element that uses the OLAC linguistic-type encoding scheme to identify the type of the resource from a linguistic point of view.
DCMI Type   1   0 
Precision   1   0 
Quality score  7